Don’t Shy Away from High Standards

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Ever had a manager who really pushed you? Who constantly demanded more out of you? I’m talking someone who didn’t have to say it, but expected you to push and drive for more on a daily basis? To be better. To be on point. To be on time – aka 15 minutes early. To have deliverables and commitments ready means reviewed 3 times the week before it’s needed. To be prepared – aka to have five pre socialization meetings before the actual meeting. To be proactive. To take ownership. To make the client look good. To add value. To speak with conviction. To expect more out of yourself, more than anything.

Fortunately, I had a few managers like that early on in my career. True leaders who constantly issued positive challenges to me. Direct, prescriptive and lucid directions or ideas on how I could be better, take on more responsibility, add more value to our clients, teams and organizations.

Regardless of you’re personal, communal or professional doings – what makes you better as an individual is accountability for your own: attitude, efforts, results. What makes you better in a more leadership-centric role: accountability, effort and ownership over the team’s results. And so on up to the highest levels of organization. 

Today, there’s an epidemic that’s society wide but especially impacts individuals within organizations. People avoid setting high standards for themselves…we’re all guilty of this at some point, just some more than others. Individuals, especially in large organizations, do everything they can to say they’re “innovative”, they’re “leaders”, they’re “engaging”, they’re “proactive” – but this is far from the truth. Most folks are hiding in organizations. And they run like Usain Bolt when high standards are placed on them by others. Setting high standards for other people? That’s why influencers, mentors, managers, coaches, executives, etc. who are good are in short supply, high demand. Setting high standards for other people is hard because it feels confrontational, and people avoid conflict at all costs.

Success + growth today – is predicated on seeking out and staying close to those people who set ridiculously high standards and expectations for you personally, communally and professionally. Sound familiar? Well when you hear people talk about you as the product of the 5 people you most associate with, it makes sense.

Don’t just set high standards and expectations for you personally. Seek out those who demand more of you. Finding them can be hard. Expecting and accepting their challenges is harder. So rise to the occassion, and express gratitude as you grow and learn from them.

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Not only is the story somewhat entertaining if you have experience in a corporate/consulting/team setting but it also does something for me and something for you (readers).

For me, it provides an opportunity to document and reflect on some of the more important experiences that I’ve had so I can pull from them later.

For you, if you’re into this type of thing – whether looking to have more influence, be a better coach or find yourself in a management capacity – I think there are some good lessons…

First, if you’re looking to be a more effective <manager, coach, mentor, influencer, etc.> you have to know your people before you can deploy any strategy around building and growing their capabilities. Why? Let me draw a parallel to horse racing – the jockey knows how much he can get out of his horse – i.e. how much he can drive the horse on a given day. But each horse is different. Sometimes you have a horse that knows zero bounds and would run itself into the ground if you asked it to. Other times, you might be sitting on the next secretariat, but with a sensitive demeanor, or poor attitude. People are the same so you have to learn how to drive them – and that usually takes time, getting to know them. The story below highlights how my manager tapped into my competitive nature and issued positive challenges to get more out of me. You’ll also see that positive challenges are one of the primary tools influencers and high performers use.

Second, when talking about the high level of standards required in achieving & sustaining high performance or influencing people – we have to mention details. In the story I’ll paint a picture for why the tiniest details matter. High performers have ridiculously high expectations. It’s in their DNA to almost “look down” on folks who don’t uphold these types of standards. Plus, each time you cut a corner, or let something go, you’re creating an opening for “good enough” to be acceptable.

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First, let’s level set on semantics I used in the title of this paragraph. A ‘manager’ could plausibly be anyone who oversees the responsibilities, efforts and results of a single other person or it could be anyone with a ‘management’ title – a range which could run up from a small team or division manager to a regional director or CEO.

So when I say direct manager, I’m referring to a manager in consulting. Where he was responsible for growing + building me as a consultant and ensuring that I was performing for the client. But by defenition, doing the bare minimum – i.e. making sure I delivered just enough, making sure the client was happy, making sure I didn’t fuck things up too much – that would be enough by definition as far as his management responsibilites are concerned.

But that’s not a high performer…I’ll reiterate: a high performer is someone who sets high standards for themselves and isn’t afraid to push high standards and expectations on those around them. That’s exactly what he did.

I remember these days vividly – even missing them at times – the laughs, camaraderie and ridiculous personalities of colleagues and clients (especially). We were about three months into the most challenging engagement I had ever been on. It was in the wealth management business unit of a large investment bank – working on an initiative that had c-level visibility and lots of attention,  when I first dropped the term ‘irregardless’.

My manager – we’ll call him Andy for now – and I were debating how an array of financial account types (think retirement vs. brokerage vs. trust, etc.) would require different back-end processes to support a front end experience that collects varying types and amounts of required regulatory information from clients.

In the heat of debate, I said something along the lines of: “well, irregardless, the individual and brokerage accounts have the same reg requirements”.

Andy fired back with: “no, that’s not right”.

Perplexed, I said: “what do you mean that’s not right? I’m looking at the requirements right in front of me”.

Andy just laughs and, while jumping onto a call we were 6 minutes late for, said: “Sorry dude, I meant that first part of what you said was wrong. It’s regardless. Irregardless isn’t a word, you know that right?”

I couldn’t help but laught, knwoing he was right, and mentioned in passing that I had my mom to thank for that habit.

Over the next few months I focused big on getting rid of that word – and other poor verbal habits I had. Bad habits, straight up, are tough to rewire. And I could have chose to ignore something seemingly so miniscule. Because how much does it really help you to use the mental bandwidth, willpower or discipline to avoid tiny mistakes lke that? Ones that don’t really seem to be a driver of benefit or value. Surprisingly, it’s a tremendous value-add over time because you begin to catch even the smalles of issues in verbal + written semantics. The problem, is that it’s not measurable – which in business many times means it’s invisible – and certainly not gratifying or noticeable for your performance review.

The engagement was moving along at hyper-speed and I came to know just how detailed Andy was. I’d always prided myself on attention to detail being one of my competencies. But he was on another level, and it just came with ease for him. It was his standard.

That type of a-game standard can be one of two things: intimidating or inspiring. Either you welcome it, and embrace the positive challenge issued to you, asking you to rise to the occassion or you dismiss it and pick apart the rationale or motive behind it. Accepting the challenge is always the decision that makes you better.

About 8 months into the engagement I had grown a lot and learned a ton from Andy. I had built trust with the clients, as well as Andy, and was driving things on the ground at the client site managing stakeholders while he was overseas or working remotely from out of state.

In one of our last meetings together in New York we had a number of senior clients in a meeting where I was walking through a massive road map of our requirements, process flows and an inventory of product capabilities. Andy was sitting directly to my right at the corner of a big conference room table, and I was answering some questions about potential engagement dependencies with other initiatives when I decided again to drop the word irregardless.

Client A: “What happens if feature Y doesn’t get delivered before X as we expected?”

Adam: “Well, based on our analysis and discussion with blue team, you really don’t need Y before X, because X can piggy-back off of Z’s requirements – which has a guaranteed delivery ahead of X. So “irregardless” of Y’s delivery, we still get X as part of day one minimum viable product.”

*Almost immediately Andy slides over a little bit and I feel a nudge on my foot/ankle, so I glance over at him. He’s glaring at me with a smirk and shaking his head. We have a client who may take the cake for being the toughest we’ve worked with, and Andy can tell he picked up on my “interesting” word choice. After the meeting:

Andy: “Dude, seriously? Great job in there, but irregardless is still not a word. English is my second language. You gotta be better. Especially with ‘client A’ in there. You know how he is – he loves those <consulting firm x> guys – don’t wanna give him any ammunition against us.”

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Assuming you’ve made it this far (thanks for suffering through it), I bet some of you are saying “wow, that’s petty”. While that’s ok, my assumption is that you’re not used to setting high standards for yourself. More specifically, you’re not comfortable with someone challenging you or setting seemingly unrealistic standards for you to live up to.

The story is just one of many examples of attention to detail, professionalism and leading by example type lessons from Andy. I’ve never in my life been told that I needed to focus heavily on attention to detail until my time with him. And you know what? I needed to hear it multipel times before I owned it and got around my natural defense mechanism, which was my old narrative that I was always the most detailed person in the room.

So, take home messages. Do you want to have influence on people? Having influence requires that you expect first from yourself, and then from others. That you can issue positive challenges to people’s competence, character, contributions and connections to team or customers. Today, more than ever, setting high standards is tough because people shy away from them, don’t believe in honoring the struggle, and avoid conflict at all costs. But you can’t back down from the expectations of others, and you can’t adjust your high standards to accomodate those around you.

The highest performers, managers, coaches, mentors, etc. change the way you think. They challenge your character. Hold you to universal standards. Never say don’t sweat the details or allow you to cut even the smallest of corners personally, communally or professionally. Having influence requires you to challenge the way people think, challenge them to contribute more, and to “role model” the way it’s supposed to be done.

Andy did that for me day in and day out. Andy developed influce with me. And for that, I’m fuckin’ thankful. Hopefully this little story helps you think about how to perform better and influence people positively.

 

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Garcinia Cambogia 95% HCA

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So you’re starting keto and have heard a ton about the Keto Flu. You’re drinking a ton of water, even adding pinches of salt to your big ass canteen or nalgene bottle full of the good ole’ H-deuce-oh.

Symptoms are starting to kick in, and you’re wondering why the hell you thought it was a good idea to go all in, and do Intermittent Fasting to kickstart your body’s fat burning metabolism.

At this point, you’re in a dark place. I feel ya, and I’ve been there. You’re desperate and ready to cave in and start eating before it’s noon and throw all your grand plans away. Well, the good news is, there are a few things I have personally found beneficial during this transition period.

Ranging from exogenous ketones and electrolyte or key mineral supplements to the topic of today’s post: supplements for suppressing or controlling appetite.

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But…but…wait…I thought…why am I hungry?

Yep, hold your hoses petey. Low-carb diets and especially those with a high fat component like keto absolutely elminate cravings for sugary, high carb snacks or meals and do suppress hunger. But this doesn’t happen until after the hard part.

The keto flu is your body’s transition period into fat adaptation, or switching the engine over to buring fat instead of carbohyrate as it’s primary fuel source. So naturally, as with anything else, we’re going to be resistant to change.

What’s literally happening is your body is like a hot furnace ripping through glycogen (stored form of glucose or carbohydrate) stores in the liver and muscles. This usually happens within 48 hours of carbohydrate restriction and at that point, the transition sets in, and your body starts working to recalibrate it’s metabolic energy production processes.

True fat adaptation can be as quick as a week or two, or take up to 6 months. Now, this doesn’t mean that flu symptoms last that long. Usually those are gone within 5 to 7 days. The lengthy process of fat adaptation is likely occuring for you and you don’t even realize it. But the longer you’re in ketosis (nutritional ketosis is defined as blood ketone levels of 0.5 mMol/L) the better your body gets at burning fat for fuel, meaning the next time you try ketosis, the transition will be easier.

Now getting back to the point. Once you make the shift to burning fat the keto flu symptoms ease and you’re suddenly satiated (not hungry), can look at most sweets and treats and turn the other way, are starting to feel mentally clear.

For those of us who want to engage in Intermittent Fasting, though, even once you’re in ketosis for an extended period of time there are days where you just want to consume calories before noon right?

Take me, for example…I woke up today and checked my blood – ketones were 0.8 mMol/L and glucose was 91 – that’s pretty good. I’d like ketones to be higher, but considering the high protein chicken wings I ate last night for the superbowl, I’m ok with this. But I have to say, I was hungrier than normal and I really wasn’t looking forward to waiting until noon to eat (i’m currently doing 16/8 intermittent fasting, with an 8 hour feeding window from noon to 8pm).

But I’m feeling good, and feeling fantastic cognitively as I write this post at around 10:50am EST. For the first week or two of my intermittent fasting, this would have not been the case. My hunger was making it tough to focus, so I started looking for something to help.

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Back in my senior year of college I was coming off of a foot surgery where I sat on my ass and had rehab all summer. So I put on a few L-B-z from riding the couch for the summer and was really focused on getting back to form. I played collegiate lacrosse and was the captain of my team, so setting the tone during fall ball was important. Coming back out of shape wasn’t an option.

I had done some research on natural appetite suppressants and fat burners and came across Garcinia Cambogia. Back then I knew much less about general nutrition and was purely feeding the machine for twice daily workouts and intense practices. So it’s hard to say whether this natural substance actually helped at all.

In 2017, while struggling to get fat adapted and make it through days of intermittent fasting, I remembered Garcinia Cambogia and said you know what, let’s give this shot. I ordered some off of Amazon by Garcinia Labs called Garcinia Cambogia 95% HCA 100% Pure Garcinia Extract 1540 MG.

Now, I know very little about this company. Typically that’s a no go for me on my checklist for buying a supplement. But because I had tried it and had no issues back in the day, I had no problem using a small, 30 day supply to get me through the hard days of intermittent fasting.

So feel free to try this out as your easing into Intermittent Fasting, Ketosis or any other Low-Carb nutritional protocol this year. As always, best of luck, and feel free to comment on this post or reach out to me directly with feedback or thoughts.

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21 Carb Keto Chocolate Shake

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A challenge for most people trying to stick with a high-fat/low-carb protocol like the ketogenic diet is avoiding treats. Especially during the adaptation phase where your body is making a shift to burning fat as it’s primary fuel source instead of glucose. Now, I’m not advising that this shake is a good plugin for your cravings during that time period. I always believe it’s best to restrict carbs as much as is tolerable during that period, and then once your adapted, your in a much better position to digest carbs more efficiently – and by that, I meant there is much less insulin resistance and spike in glucose.

But once the hunger and cravings go away, if you’re like me, you’re probably going to want some type of comfort food at some point. And for me this does the trick – with lots of quality fat and adequate protein.

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1/2 to 1 serving of a low to no carb grass fed protein source like whey or collagen – unflavored, chocolate or vanilla works

1/2 cup of full fat coconut milk – the stuff from the can

1.5 TBSP of Cacao Powder

1 TBSP of low to no glycemic impact artificial sweetener (e.g. Xylitol, Swerve, Monk’s Fruit)

3/4 TBSP of Pure Vanilla Extract [*Optional – use vanilla powder instead of extract]

1 TBSP MCT Oil

1 Teaspoon Cinnamon

*Optional 1 TBSP Chia Seeds

3/4 Cup Cold Water

1 Cup Ice

*Optional ground flaxseed or flaxseed oil

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Slap it all in a high powered blender and get to crackin’, ju herd?

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Want to save this for later? Wait until you’re ready to drink this shake to add the ice and blend it. You don’t want to add the ice, blend it, and then throw it in the fridge – the consistency isn’t as good if you blend and let sit. My advice, if you’re not going ham on this right when you make it, is to let all the ingredients sit in a blender in the fridge, and then toss in 1 cup of ice when you’re ready to enjoy it.

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Upgraded Protein Shake

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A challenge for most people trying to stick with a high-fat/low-carb protocol like the ketogenic diet is avoiding treats. Especially during the adaptation phase where your body is making a shift to burning fat as it’s primary fuel source instead of glucose. Now, I’m not advising that this shake is a good plugin for your cravings during that time period. I always believe it’s best to restrict carbs as much as is tolerable during that period, and then once your adapted, your in a much better position to digest carbs more efficiently – and by that, I meant there is much less insulin resistance and spike in glucose.

But once the hunger and cravings go away, if you’re like me, you’re probably going to want some type of comfort food at some point. And for me this does the trick – with lots of quality fat and adequate protein.

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3 to 4 cups of Unsweetened Coconut Milk <unsweetened almond, soy or cashew milk can be substituted> depending on desired consistency.

* Optional 1/2 to 1 cup Cold Water depending on desired consistency

1 serving of Vanilla or Unflavored Grass-Fed or Plant Based Protein [I prefer complete proteins like whey or collagen]

1 teaspoon Cinnamon

1 heaping TSP of Vanilla Chai flavored Maca Boost by Gaia Herbs

1 heaping TSP of Creatine Monohydrate by Douglas Laboratories

1/3 to 1/2 Cup Chia Seeds

1 TBSP Almond Butter

1 TBSP MCT Oil

1 TBSP Grass Fed Fat [I use Bulletproof Grassfed Ghee because butter doesn’t like to blend unless at room temperature or above; I’ve heard Cacao Butter works well too.]

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Slap it all in a high powered blender and get to crackin’, ju herd?

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Mental Models: An Overview

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Learning has morphed into one of my biggest priorities over the last 1.5 years. More specifically, acquiring more worldly knowledge in areas that I’m passionate about. Knowledge that is applicable. Functional. Useful. Dynamic.

The pursuit has led me to down a path of not simply reading books, taking classes and working to understand how things work – but to completely disect the art + process of learning, or what I like to call “Knowledge Acquisition”. Some of the key things I’ve done or looked at:

Reflection on my own learning style | How did I learn growing up? What worked best for me? What worked poorly? What works for me as a professional? How do I attack research + writing? Is it efficient and self-serving?

The Education System/Process | How are we (Americans) taught growing up? Is it effective? How do we consider or judge it’s effectiveness – i.e. measuring it based on sheer volume of people pumped through the system? Or the quality over quantity approach? Two differing results, I think…

The Learning Process | What are the best ways to learn? How do I retain more information, without sifting through things or re-reading multiple times?

The Best Thinkers, Most Prolific Problem Solvers/Do’ers | Why are some people so damn smart? How do they think? What’s their learning or knowledge acquisition process?

In short, here’s where I’ve arrived: I think the vast majority of us need to re-learn how to learn. Too many of us are wired by the education system, which, sure is great for pumping a bunch of people through it, but it doesn’t really prepare us for real world applicability and problem solving. And it brings up the whole narrative around questioning the value of a college edgree or graduate program. It’s well documented, as many of you know: Entrepreneurs say it’s a joke (even though the term entrepreneur has become “cool” and lost it’s value; so many fakes out there); Academics will disagree (well, most of them); and your parents will blindly push you down that route. Bottom line, it’s being questioned and rightfully so.

Graduating college and then starting my career led me to a couple or realizations, that I’ll describe below, which sent me down a path to uncover mental models – what I believe to be one of the most effective tools for learning and knowledge acquisiton.

Epiphany One

School + Letters next to your name don’t mean jack…

Coming out of school, degree in hand and having passed CFA Level 1, I though naively I knew somethign. Fortunately I was kicked in the ass quick-fast during my job search. Reminding me I was way behind the 8-ball in terms of understanding how the real world functions. School and professional certifications do none of that. Especially school, while certs can truly only be leveraged and add value when applied in conjunction with experiential learning – aka professional experience. Real world experience. And the kicks kept coming pretty much everyday after that by smarter, savvier colleagues. But that’s the part I liked, the growth part.

Epiphany Two

…The way we are taught how to learn from very early on is flawed…and the high performers in my profession, as well as across disciplines, are those who pull from worldly truths and principles/laws…

I was fortunate to “wear many hats” as a consultant, gaining visibility to everything from strategy to execution and sometimes sitting at or taking part in conversations that I had no business – professionally or intellectually – being a part of. But I, like many of us, was ‘thrown into the fire’ so to speak and forced to acquire highly specific domain knowledge (varying for each engagement I was on) while rapidly building the soft skills and typical capabilities of a professional (presentation skills, driving meetings, navigating the organization, etc.). None of this is a bad thing, it’s actually one of the great things about a career in consulting. 

But sometimes I raise the question: Why does school – you know, the reason so many of us are up to our ears in loans – FAIL to prepare us, so obviously, for the problem solving and skillsets truly demanded in the real world?

I’ll work to answer my own question, a bit. Maybe the educational system can’t, maybe it’s impossible to design a curriculum that could truly prepare students. Sure, there are some institutions of higher learning that are not far off – e.g. MBA programs like Harvard that teach purely off of the case-based method – but that doesn’t solve the undergraduate problem. Most graduate programs, the competitive ones, don’t want some kid who just came from college and brings zero experiential value to the touble. Duhhhhhhhhhh. Why is that? Because, sorry Jimmy, you really don’t know shit. And it’s funny that our higher education systems realize that, but then charge us out the ass for the Bachelor’s degree that doesn’t do anything.

But the problem actually goes deeper than that, I think. It’s baked within our process for teaching from early on. We are encouraged (required, actually) to focus on a defined set of curriculum. To memorize facts blindly because Mr. or Mrs. Johnson said so. To regugitate information from a book. And to get good grades if we do those things successfully. We’re never taught to be skeptical, to question everything, to think outside the box. Just to blindly accept. This lack of flexibility to let our minds wander, be creative and draw conclusions from disparate and seemingly unrelated worlds is restrictive. And it shows itself in many aspects of our lives.

Where I’m concerned, I hit a point in my career where not only was I burnt out, but I was starting to plateau in my learning. I had honed some very valuable skills in analysis, problem solving and making recommendations (in addition to being a PowerPoint pro :)) but it was all very siloed in terms of my specific subject matter expertise in financial services. I craved more knowledge that was broadly and worldly applicable. And when I looked around at the highest performers, they appeared to have that. Not surprisingly, it was the folks with a STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) background that made up the majority of these high performers I worked with and admired.  From what I could see, these people were equipped with unique frameworkers for which they solved problems and looked at the world. More often than not, they understood funamental truths and laws about the world (STEM) that served as reference points and grounds for understanding new, seemingly more complex information. In other words, the differentiating feature for most of these people wasn’t just domain expertise – it was a wealth of fundamental knowledge about logic, math, science, etc. and the ability to connect the dots. A lot of fuckin’ dots.

Re-Learning How to Learn

So began my narrative around re-learning how to learn and rewiring my brain if possible. I’m now ditching my old “study” habits and defined curriculums, trying things through controlled experiments and doing a ton of research on how exactly to do this.

My quest to re-learn how to learn sent me to do research on some of the best thinkers in the world – looking at how they learn, acquire knowledge and apply it to solve problems, build businesses and sometimes change the world. The answer amongs so many of the world’s best thought leaders and decision makers: Mental Models.

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Abstract is the best way to describe the phrase mental models. And by definition, anything abstract is not overtly specific or concrete. So if your brain is operating at half speed right now you could problem ball-park a definition and come pretty close. To be clear, though, just because something is abstract and difficult to put in a box, doesn’t mean it’s not deeply useful. Many theories start out like this and serve as a lens for problem solving or uncovering truths about the world.

If you give Google a quick spin and search for Mental Models you’ll find a whole host of definitions. None of them are mutually exclusive, and personally, I’ve done my research and pulled from many definitions to conceptualize a definition in my own brain. Here it is:

Mental models are the world’s undeniable truths, the foundational building blocks of knowledge or phenomena that have been empirically validated; the rules or beliefs that have not only stood the test of time and held true, but can be applied across almost all scenarios.

Give Credit Where Credit Is Due

I have to thank Shane Parrish of the Farnam Street Blog and Michael D Simmons for their work on making Learning (and re-learning) and Thinking More Effectively accessible to all. 

Farnam Street Blog is fascinating and I highly recommend subscribing to Shane’s weekly newsletter, which is free, and is undoubtedly “brain food” you should be eating. Many very famous and successful folks from across the world follow his blog and engage with other members in his community.

Shane has a very comprehensive set of research and data on Mental Models and has created the best short video summarizing Mental Models that I’ve seen. So, here it is, from the expert…

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.100″ text_orientation=”center” max_width=”60%” module_alignment=”center”]<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/177585900" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe><!– [et_pb_line_break_holder] –><p><a href="https://vimeo.com/177585900">Farnam Street: Mental Models</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/farnamstreet">Shane Parrish</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>[/et_pb_code][et_pb_blurb title=”Where Did Mental Models Originate?” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#000000″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

Ever heard of Berkshire Hathaway? I bet you have – but most of you will think of the “Oracle of Omaha” – aka Warren Buffet. But there’s another “BB”, or Brilliant Billionaire, in Omaha.

Charlie Munger is the long-time Vice Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and Buffet’s right hand man. Revered as one of the best thinkers in the world, the book about him – Poor Charlie’s Almanack: The Wit an Wisdom of Charles T. Munger – is recommended by just about everyone.

The excerpt below is from a famous talk Charlie gave at USC Business School in 1994 called A Lesson Elementary Worldly Wisdom. In the speech, he talks about his approach to gaining practical knowledge and speaks to the fact that our current education and overall approach to learning is flawed.

I can’t confirm that he is the first to coin the term mental models, but in the excerpt below he lays the groundwork for the latticework of knowledge reference points that Shane Parrish describes in the mental-models approach.

Well, the first rule is that you can’t really know anything if you just remember isolated facts and try and bang ’em back. If the facts don’t hang together on a latticework of theory, you don’t have them in a usable form.

 

You’ve got to have models in your head. And you’ve got to array your experience both vicarious and direct on this latticework of models. You may have noticed students who just try to remember and pound back what is remembered. Well, they fail in school and in life. You’ve got to hang experience on a latticework of models in your head.

 

What are the models? Well, the first rule is that you’ve got to have multiple models because if you just have one or two that you’re using, the nature of human psychology is such that you’ll torture reality so that it fits your models, or at least you’ll think it does. …

 

And the models have to come from multiple disciplines because all the wisdom of the world is not to be found in one little academic department. That’s why poetry professors, by and large, are so unwise in a worldly sense. They don’t have enough models in their heads. So you’ve got to have models across a fair array of disciplines.

 

You may say, “My God, this is already getting way too tough.” But, fortunately, it isn’t that tough because 80 or 90 important models will carry about 90% of the freight in making you a worldly wise person. And, of those, only a mere handful really carry very heavy freight.(1)

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Folks at the forefront of the discussion on Mental Models say there are over 650.

Oh, shit…

Not so fast – the good news, I’ll remind you, is that a much smaller percentage of these models is were you should focus. And as Charlie Munger alludes to…

Only a mere handful really carry very heavy freight

The funny thing is, one of the very mental models you’ll study helps explain why a much smaller percentage of the models produces the majority of the benefits. That model, is the Pareto Principle aka the “80/20” rule, which says: a very small minority of inputs or efforts produce a majority of the outputs and results…e.g. a minority of costs produce a majority of profits; a minority of your time produces the majority of your results. Applied the opposite way, 20% of your relationships cause 80% of the drama or stress.

One other example, just because most of you may not think of it, is the good old scientific method. Remember that nonsense from back in, say, 4th or 5th grade biology? I may be wrong on the timing of the curriculum, but the scientific method is a very interesting mental model because it’s actually been used to validate many of the other fundamental truths we know in the world across all disciplines. The scientific method is an approach used for investigating phenomena. Here’s a refresher:

1. Make an observation

2. Ask a question

3. Form a hypothesis or multiple hyptheses – i.e. a testable explanation for the observation and assocaited question

4. Make a prediction as to the results of the hypothesis and test.

5. Test the prediction

6. Evaluate the results and make iterations – i.e. adjust hypotheses or predictions.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”How Science + Metcalfe’s Law Tell Us That Mental MOdels Can Help Us Learn and UPgrade our Brain” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#000000″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

Once you come up with your own way of defining or explaining the cocept of mental models it should be clear to see the value in creating the latticework or network of reference points that some of the world’s most successful people use to hang further knowledge and experiences on.

 I know that many of you are skeptical. And I’m proud of you for that, because a healthy dose of skepticism is how I approach life 🙂

But because of that, I’m going to break down the hard science behind why mental models work…

First off – your brain is literally a network. Areas and regions responsible for different functions. Wired together with millions and millons of synapses + pathways and neurons (brain cells).

Second – we actually use less than 50% of our brain power regardless of task. This is because different parts of the brain are required, depending on the type of task we’re performing.

Third – Neuroplasticity tells us that our most important asset, our brain, can be upgraded. We do, indeed, have the ability to “upgrade” our brains. We can literally become smarter and healthier by rewiring our brain.

Now, how you go about “upgrading” your brain is where there’s likely many approaches.  Here’s how I see mental models as the perfect tool for the upgrading the network that is your brain…

I like to think of mental models in relation to books that you’ve read. While it’s not an apples to apples comparison, if you think of a book shelf with unlimited room for books, that’s your brain. The rules are that you can only add a book to the shelf once you’ve read it. The more books on the shelf, the more knowledge you’ve acquired and the more experiential learning you can hang on that knowledge or use to “connect the dots”.

Well, because you’re brain is the same damn thing as a network, think of the books as nodes in a network. The brain has millions of pathways that probably never fire or connect to nodes in its other regions. Mental Models become your opportunity to add nodes to the network, and as you continue to acquire mental models, the connections your brain can make become much more valuable.

Think about it in terms of Metcalfe’s Law – which says that the value of any network goes up exponentially for every new user on the network – it’s been used to value the internet and new social networks like Facebook.

So, if you want to increase the value of the network that is your brain, add more nodes or users to that network. The nodes are mental models. Boom.

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High Performance Habits | How Extraordinary People Become That Way by Brendon Burchard

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Why is it that some people have success very quickly, early on, and then crash and burn? Why do some start out rough and then climb quickly? And why the heck are some fortunate or skilled enough to go fast early and then continue to succeed over the long term? Most importantly, of the small percentage of folks who have success early and can sustain it, why are some miserable and some report being completely happy and fulfilled?

Brendon Burchard has spent more than 20 years looking for detailed answers to those questions and performing some of the most comprehensive research on high performers in the world. But early on he hit a pleateua in his career coaching high performers. One day, one of his more introverted clients got fed up, and demanded that Brendon show him HOW to be a high performer and not WHAT other high performers were doing.

We’re all hoping to achieve the pinnacle of success and fulfillment in our lives. But HOW?

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Thankful. Tremendously thankful. That’s how I feel when discussing the lessons I learned in athletics growing up. I remember trotting apprehensively onto the field as an energetic, naive and very impressionable 2nd grader for my first ever football practice. Looking back, thank god my mother allowed me to play organized sports, especially football. Playing sports helped teach me a number of what I would later read in this book to be “high performance habits” by building confidence, pulling alot of my natural abilities to the surface by holding me accountable to rise to the occassion when I was scared, and making it very clear that we were in it for eachother, the team, the community, something much bigger than ourselves. I bring this up because part of the value in this book, which I hope you read and come to find out, is that everything can be learned, and learned by anyone.

So there weren’t any bumps along the way? Absolutely not. Like trying to quit in 5th grade because coach supposedly promised me I would start at running back. Being told I was too small to play Linebacker. Hearing my friends, who I worked at least 10 times harder than, declare lofty goals that I didn’t even have the courage to discuss. Or almost never playing Lacrosse in college because I never considered it to be possible even during an All-American campaign my senior year.

Yet it turned out to be the bumps in the road that made me dig deeper and find new levels of performance. The failures and setbacks forced me back to the drawing board. Forced me to look inside myself, and say, if I wasn’t going to quit, then I had to come up with a plan to find the inputs to my athletic performance that I could absolutely control and then master. I was never the guy who could “just show up”, and I realized early on that my weapon was effort, competing and the process.

Focusing on the inputs I could control – running sprints, stretching, nutrition, footwork, taking hundreds of shots and playing hundreds of hours of wall ball when no one was looking – molded me into the guy who would run you ragged. Break your will. As I grew older, and my body matured, my athleticism caught up to my preparation but I kept the same chip on my shoulder, that appreciation for the process and details. The respect for it.

Because I had success athletically that continued into collegiate sports, I became more and more confident in my approach. I brought it into the workplace as management consultant. As a matter of fact, I credit this approach as the only reason I even had a sniff at the professional opportunities that have come my way. Early on the approach worked wonders, but eventually I got burnt out and I slowly, apprehensively, had to admit to myself that this aggressive “push through it”/”keep grinding” approach wasn’t sustainable. The funny thing is, the approach became a limiting agent for my success both personally and professionally. It was hard for me to admit, but what is one to do once you land there?

Well, I started by going back to the drawing board, much the way I’d advise you to. Admitting a certain sense of defeat or submitting yourself to a more open mind is liberating. Or at least it was for me. I had always been obsessive about preparation, controlling my outcomes and really driving away from my fear of failure or rejection.

I started reflecting. Even as a young kid, I remember feeling bewildered by people who didn’t understand my approach. Who didn’t work as hard. Who didn’t understand that success and failure was determined largely by your effort. Early on it was family, friends, teammates. Later in my professional life it was still family and friends, but there was a lot of reinforcement from colleagues, too.

Why is he so focused? So driven? Why are his expectations so high? Why doesn’t he just take a break? Why does he take certain things so seriously?

So as part of my own journey of learning, I wanted to look for books, people, situations, etc. that would help me better understand the psychology of high performance. Maybe make better sense of my own approach. To tweak that approach. And most importantly to understand the opportunities I have to improve my approach, especially in those areas where I tend to get in my own way. Things like analysis paralysis, being a perfectionist with the wrong things, focusing on the wrong things completely, not delegating, not managing time effectively, etc.

I first heard Brendon Burchard on Lewis Howe’s School of Greatness podcast and immediately his story resonated with me. Walking through the six habits with Lewis, Brendon dropped the hook, line and sinker on me when he started talking about how many people find successful early on, but burn out or simply plateau. The truly extraordinary are those who can sustain success and prolific output, and most of the time, it takes throwing away some of the habits that got you there, reengineering some, and adopting a learners approach to fostering new ones.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”The Lay Of The Land” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px”]After the Introduction, where you learn about Burchard’s background and his ‘why’, he breaks the book down into to three key sections: Personal Habits, Social Habits and Sustaining Success. The latter is what really convinced me to give this book a read because while he lays the habits out in a very unique way with some important psychology and research behind them, I believe 80% has been said or done just in a different way. Below you can see his six high performance habits which I’ll outline on at a time in a bit more detail.
[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_image src=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/HPH-HP6-5-Influence-Images.002-e1502780369847.jpeg” align=”center” _builder_version=”3.0.98″][/et_pb_image][et_pb_blurb title=”Review + Recommendation” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px”]Oddly, I think the title of this book is slightly misleading. In the introduction, Burchard talks about why he wrote “High Performance Habits – How Extraordinary People Become That Way” and focuses on his coaching career. Early on, he had some success, but spent a lot of time showing his clients what other successful people were doing and deploying a whole host of psychology and personality tests. Eventually, one of his clients got fed up and said I need to know HOW to achieve higher performance. The HOW is largely what set the wheels in motion for this book.

The book does a really good job focusing on the HOW: habits, routines, self-talk and literal things that high performers do. But for me the title makes it seem as if it will storytell on specific high performers and how they rose to high performer status. And I’m glad the book does not. But what I think the book doesn’t account for in the title is it’s most valuable asset: unpacking the self-talk and psychology of high performers.

I would rate this book very highly, probably a 4/5, but take that with a grain of salt because this is the type of material I love to read. It may be slightly lower if you’re not interested in specific habits and the psychology behind them. And I think this book is an absolute must read for:

  1. Anyone who wants to understand the psychology and “backbone” behind high performers. Whether that’s yourself, a loved one or a friend.
  2. Anyone looking to get rid of bad habits, reengineer and fine tune existing ones and foster new ones for peak performance.
  3. Anyone who has hit a wall or plateaued and needs to transition into deeper work and deeper planning for the next level.

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— Yo Yo Ma

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Seek Clarity” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px”]Do you wait until New Year’s to perform a self-evaluation and start the process of thinking about what changes you want to make? While there’s definitely an end of the year evaluation and thousands of variations of “visioning” exercises out there that high performers use, New Year’s even is not the time to start thinking about it.

High Performers are constantly seeking clarity. This doesn’t necessarily mean they get clarity, but the research shows that they are in search of it much more than other people. If they’re not finding pursuing it, even if it’s outside of their comfort zone, they’re not comfortable.

Worknig with Oprah, Burchard notes, she starts every meeting with seeking crystal clarity on purpose and on what matters. “What’s important for this meeting?”, “What’s our intention for this meeting?”. In my career as a consultant, I found this to be the case with the top performers too. There were more senior consultants than me, or even director and c-level clients, who took their time and intentions so seriously it came across as standoffish. But those types of high performers want to be clear on their intentions.

High Performers aren’t scared of the answers they might find in pursuit of clarity. They’re comfortable getting clarity and focusing on what’s important even if they’re wrong.

How are they Seeking Clarity? Burchard recommends focus on four categories: Self, Skills, Social and Service.

If you spend more time honestly and deeply answering clarifying questions around those four areas more than others, you’re going to have an edge.

  • How do you want to describe your ideal self?
  • How do you want to behave socially?
  • What skills do you want to develop and demonstrate?
  • What service do you want to provide? [to others, customers, clients, family friends, community especially]

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Generate Energy” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px”]So here’s my take on generating energy. The last five years or so have really driven home the importance of health for people. And that doesn’t just mean getting your fruits and vegetables, and exercising 20 minutes for 3 times per day. The problem today, is that most people are living completely above the shoulders, disconnected from the physical aspects of the body. Putting yourself in the best position to succeed requires a wholistic focus on Nutrition, Movement, Mental, Emotional and Cognitive function. Movement does not simply mean checking the box and getting your 20 minutes in a few days a week on the elliptical. It’s moving, stretching and flowing your body through it’s full range of motion. Simply using your body to do what it was designed to do. Move!

Burchard alludes to research, that not surprisingly, shows that most people lose energy thoughout the day and by 2 or 3pm they’re ready to have a nap. Do you know any high performers that are ready to checkout in the afternoon? Nope. I’ll bet the majority of high performers you know are off the walls with energy, glowing, the entire day…leaving you wondernig what the hell they’re on?!

Now I’m someone who believes tremendously in the power of Nutrition, Movement and Mental & Cognitive Health practices as a huge key to improving your performance. It’s the basis for the High Performance Lab. Engaging in a low-carb/low-sugar nutritional protocol like the Ketogenic Diet, working out, yoga or mindfulness practice in the morning are all some of the things I’d recommend doing to stoke the fires of your furnace and generate energy.

When it comes to executing at your best day in and day out, Burchard and team found that most energy is lost in the transitions between tasks, meetings, etc. High performers have the transitions figured out.

So what does Burchard and team recommend to be more energized, creative and effective in your execution? Give you’re mind and body a break every 60 minutes – even if it’s just for 2 or 3 minutes. This is something he repeatedly alludes to later in the book.
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For many reasons, this section struck a chord with me. I’ve always been motivated to take a tremendous amount of pride in anything I put my hands on. It’s not perfectionism. It’s pride. And I think alot of it has been motivated by feelings of guilt when I’m not living in my values or bringing the best version of myself to the table. Burchard talks about Internal and External Forces in that drive our Performance Necessity.

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High Performers are driven by all of these factors, but most people start out falling toward one side or another, and must adopt habits, and find ways to “raise the necessity” of their performance for themselves and for others.

Whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my hear to do it well; whatever I ahve devoted myself to I have devoted myself to completely. – Charles Dickens

High Performers are finding ways the raise the psychological necessity of their performance. The top 15% of High Performers, out of more than 20,000 surveyed, interviewed by Brendon and who have worked with him personally, all associate a deep sense of identiy with performing well. It’s not just a sense of meaning or validation – it’s as critical as food and water for high performers.

Many people are scared to put their identities on the line. To show too much caring, too much effort. But high performers replace preference, or passion with necessity. It’s not an option.

To raise necessity, Burchard urges us to use the transition periods between tasks, meetings, work weeks, months, etc. to think about why you must perform well. And to do so, ask yourself: Who needs me on my ‘A’ game right now? Why?

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row use_custom_width=”on” custom_width_px=”700px” custom_padding=”|||” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” module_alignment=”center”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.92″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Social Habits” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|on||||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”45px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”1.5em” body_font=”Roboto|700|||||||” body_text_align=”center” background_color=”#8e8e8e” border_radii=”on|100px|100px|100px|100px” custom_margin=”|||” custom_padding=”30px|||”][/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”25.5938px|0px|0px|0px” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.92″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”%22Nothing Is Less Productive Than To Make More Efficient What Should Not Be Done At All.%22″ content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.92″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|||||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”1.5em” body_font=”Roboto|700|||||||” body_text_align=”center”]– Peter Drucker
[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Increase Productivity” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px”]Everyone wants to be more productive. More effective. More efficient. It’s the topic of the last book review I did, on The Effective Executive by Peter Drucker, who is also the author of the wisdom in the quote above.

Research shows that if you simply “feel more productive” you’re statistically more likley to feel happier, more successfuly, more confident. Que the question in your head: yea, duh, but how is what we really want to know. How do you get more productive?

Before we get to the more advanced practices, Burchard believes there are three fundamentals or basics when it comes to increasing productivity. By increasing your the level of your Goals, Energy and Focus in that order.

Goals: whether you’re a team or an individual, being productive means establishing lofty goals that are highly specific, measurable and I’ll reiterate – aimed high.

Energy: increasing your energy is the focus of chapter 2 called “Generate Energy”. But all of those habits around taking care of yourself physically, mentally and emotionally hold true here. Generating energy is a prerequisite for the majority of the book and for high performance as a whole. Your productivity is tied to physical, emotional and mental energy that makes you happier and not just more productive but more creative, dependable, consistent, etc.

Focus: today more than ever we’re plagued by what I always call “the gift and the curse”. It’s technology and access to information. Burchard highlights three key areas that you must attack to maintain focus.

  1. Information Overload – analysis paralysis is real. You need to find ways to filter this information and reduce stimulus especially at key times where you’re engaging in deep work. One of the keys to avoiding this? Dedicate a morning routine and avoid checking social media or email until specific times.
  2. Distractions – want to kill your productivity by 20% or more? Allow for distractions. How about slow your thinking by 50%? Allow distractions. One of the biggest culprits is email and social media. Avoid checking these first thing in the morning and set dedicated time for email within your routine. The king of distraction is multi-tasking, which many people put on resumes or claim to be a skill. The truth is, and many other writers like Peter Drucker allude to this, being effective requires that you focus intensely on a single task at a time for results. Moving on to another task while your brain is performing another, or has yet to fully process it, impacts both tasks.
  3. Interruptions – for many people, especially in large organizations, being interrupted during a given task, activity or meeting is just the norm. While I think it’s wrong and definitely a productivity killer, it’s hard to imagine how to solution for this. Just one interruption in the worday can throw off important and scheduled tasks by up to two or three hours.

Now let’s talk about the three more advanced practices Burchard prescribes…

PRACTICE #1 | INCREASE OUTPUTS THAT MATTER

“Nothing is less productive than to make more efficient what should not be done at all”. – Peter Drucker

Earlier in the book Burchard talks about how High Performers have identified their Primary Field of Interest (PFI) and focus on specializing there. Gaining knowledge, expertise, credibility, etc. Once you figure out your PFI(s) you then need to hone in on doing the right things.

What are the right ouptuts, deliverables, products or content you need to be developing as outcomes? If you spend a day at the office struggling to create a deliverable that sends you home saying “what did I really create today, and why doesn’t it have any real impact?” then you’re probably not focusing on the right outputs.

The greatest authors, artists, entrepreneurs, and other high performers have determined their PFI, exactly what outputs they should produce, and then focus aggressively on Prolific Quality Output (PQO) – which means producing a ton of high quality outputs.

How do you implement this practice? First, you have to be solid on your PFI(s), or at least one of them. Second, get clear on your outputs. Third, if possible, dedicate 60% of your working hours to PQO – which might be research, writing, content devlopment, etc. while the other 40% includes the other tasks and activities that support or enable your primary functions. Things like going over strategy, managing your team or colleagues, managing upward, building relationships with customers or clients, spending time on email, and social media.

PRACTICE #2 | CHART YOUR FIVE MOVES

“I believe half the unhappiness in life comes from people being afraid to go straight at things” – William Locke

So many of us decide on a goal and have success early. Sometimes tremendous success. And we reach that success even while handling everything, wearing every hat as an entrepreneur, or even being a do-it-all athlete. Eventually, though, the same habits that get you there will need to be refined. Shooting from the hip will need to be replaced with planning. And multi-tasking replaced with deep work and focus.

Now that you’ve determined you’re PFI and the field or industry where you want to generate Prolific Quality Output (PQO) it’s time to set ambitious goals and then ask yourself…

“If there were only five major moves to make that goal happen, what would they be?”

The question is one of the bases for what Burchard calls “5 Move Planning”…

  1. Decide What You Want – this is where you set the most amitious goal(s) possible for yourself.
  2. Determine The Five Major Moves – prioritize a list of five major moves that you must make. Each of them becomes an individual project or bucket with deliverables, tasks, activities and deadlines that must be mapped out and managed.
  3. Do Deep Work On Each of The Five Major Moves – 60% of your time
  4. Supporting Tasks/Enablers – 40% of your time should be spent designating the remaining support activities under one of three categories: 1) Distraction; 2) Delegate; or 3) DO – where you block off pre-defined time to execute on these activities alone or as a team.

For steps #1 and #2, the most important thing is to remember that the HOW? doesn’t matter until you know the WHAT?…so for every major goal you have, figure out the Five Moves.

PRACTICE #3 | GET INSANELY GOOD AT KEY SKILLS

“Everything is trainable”

From the get go, I was relieved to see Burchard’s support of specialization and mastery. Throughout the book, he places emphasis on the fact that high performers, regardless of their profession, have focused a very small number of Primary Fields of Interest and aggressively sought to build skills and knowledge.

Burchard’s advice is to determine the knowledge, competencies and skills you need to excel and win in your Primary Field of Interest (PFI). Right now, determine the 5 major skills to be developed over the next three (3) years.

The underlying principle and belief required to develop your skills is that “everything is trainable” – otherwise people are enabled to make excuses or simply “try” to master things.

Bruchard recommends leveraging “Progressive Mastery” which is similar to Deliberate Practice, coined by Anders Ericsson, except it places much more emphasis on emotion, socialization and teaching. Below are the steps to progressive mastery:

  1. Determine a skill that you want to master
  2. Set specific stretch goals
  3. Attach high levels of emotion and meaning to developing that skill
  4. Identify the critical factors for success and develop strenghts in those areas/fix weaknesses
  5. Develop visualizations that imagine what success and failure look like
  6. Schedule challenging practices develped by experts or careful thought
  7. Measure your progress, and get outside feedback
  8. Socialize your learning and efforts by practicing or competing with others
  9.  Continue setting higher-level goals to keep improving
  10. Teach others what you’re learning

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How many people have challenged your words, your actions and your character? Probably not too many. But High Performers do this on a regular basis, developing influence by teaching people how to think and challenging them to grow.

Teach People How To Think

In every situation of potential influence, ask yourself how you want other people to think about themselves, other people and the world at large. And then ask questions or say things that shape the way they think like “Think of it this way…” or “What would happen if we tried…”

Challenge People To Grow

Observe people’s character, connections and contributions. Then actively challenge them to develop these things even further – “Have you given this effort your all?” or “are you treating those around you as best you can?” or “have we seen your best contributions yet?”. While some people think that this is confrontational, there’s an art to it, but it brings people to higher levels especially when you set an example yourself…which is the next key.

Role Model The Way

71% of high performers from Brendon and team’s survey said they think about being a role model every day for their family, team, community. Ask questions and more importantly take actions that inspire others to believe in themselves, give all of themselves to the task at hand and serve others around them with heart, integrity and excellence.

 

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How many people have challenged your words, your actions and your character? Probably not too many. But High Performers do this on a regular basis, developing influence by teaching people how to think and challenging them to grow.

Honor The Struggle

We’re surrounded by memes and media and influencers telling us we’re not supposed to struggle, that life should just be an easy flow or we’re on the wrong track. Imagine what that’s doing to our abilities. Imagine what that’s doing to our odds of ever taking courageous action.

Older generations chammpioned worker harder than anyone else, striving for a dream in the face of hardship because those efforts make you better. Meeting struggle with poise is what earned  you respect and made you a leader. Today, that is simply not the case. Everyone has a sense of entitlement, and turns their back when it gets tough. Entrepreneurship today is cool, until you have to have some skin in the game. School is cool, until classes get in the way of partying or sitting on your ass. Saving up for a car or to start a business is cool, until you actually have to do it and it’s not handed to you, right?

When you have the opportunity to learn, serve and strive through the hard times, do it. Expect it form yourself. Welcome it…because it makes you stronger. High Performers welcome it, they honor the struggle.

Share Your Truth and Ambitions

Humankind wants to be free. We also want the freedom of truth and authenticity – what’s called personal freedom. Be strong and courageous enough to show up in the world as your true self by consistently sharing your truest thoughts, feelings, needs and dreams.

Find Someone To Fight For

You’ll do more for others than you will for yourself. Find a noble cause, community or significant other to rise to the occasion for.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”The #1 Thing – The Three C’s of Confidence” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px”]

As is our confidence, so is our capacity. – William Hazlitt

Burchard ends the book with an overview of the three components of confidence, which he refers to as, “the #1 thing” when it comes to high performance.

Develop Competence

Competence is your knolwedge, skill or ability. It’s something you can train and build with effort. All of the top 15% of high performers cited the confidence-competence loop, where your confidence increases as a result of years of dedicated practice, focus and learning that pays off with accomplishments, validation and taking on new challenges to build both confidence and competence.

Be Congruent

Self-trust is the first secret of success

You can’t be exactly the same in every moment or situation. That wouldn’t be healthy. But you need to stay true to who you are, and be congruent with how you “show up in the world”. What are your standards, and are you honoring them? Do you practice what you preach and think? Are you being honest with who you are? Do you make a stand when the world challenges who you can become?

Seeking clarity is highly correlated with congruence, and therefore confidence. Clarity begets congruence begets confidence.

Enjoy Connecting

 “You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.”

Be interested in other people. Confidence comes from less projection and more connection.

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High Performance Lab 002 | Solocast on Stress Management Strategies

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.98″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”center” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]Adam goes on a solo mission for this episode to dive deep into stress management. In this long-form podcast, we talk through how to define the concept of stress given its subjective nature, the different categories of stress, why it’s healthy in manageable doses, how our stress response works, the evolution of stress up until the modern day and finish off with our six strategies for managing stress and not letting it manage youw up in.
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“All of the things which were designed as a response to keep us alive (thousands of years ago) and defend against real threats…they’re now stagnant and manifesting themselves internally – and doing damage to our metabolic processes, overall health and leading to chronic disease…”

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.98″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.98″ text_orientation=”center”]<iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" allow="autoplay" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/364833395&color=%2346db25&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true"></iframe>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.98″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Subscribe On iTunes, Now!” url=”https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/high-performance-lab/id1314774483?mt=2″ image=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/icons8-apple-80.png” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”center” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]

“The most important piece of managing stress is anticipating the stressful periods ahead and putting structure in place…”

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.98″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”The Beats” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”1.7em” body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”left” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]You heard it here first – we’re huge fans of old school hip hop especially from the big apple, so an essential part of every episode will be the beats we use for the intro/outro and segways.

Intro/Outro:  Electric Relaxation by A Tribe Called Quest

Segways: Halftime by Nas
[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Show Notes” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”1.7em” body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”left” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]

  • Intro [start to 6:30]
  • Stove Top Beatz [6:40 to 8:20]
  • Six (6) Stress Management Strategies [8:30 to 45:20]
  • Honing in On The Concept of Stress [45:30 to 54:15]
  • How our Stress Response Works: A Hypothetical Scenario (this is where big foot comes in) [54:30 to 58:30]
  • How our Stress Response Works: Play by Play [58:45 to 1:04:15]
  • Common Signs & Symptoms [1:04:30 to 1:11:00]
  • Evolution of The Stress Response [1:11:15 to 1:19:28]
  • American Psychological Association: Snapshot of Statistics [1:19:45 to 1:24:45]
  • Closing Thoughts [1:25:00 to 1:26:00

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Resources” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”1.7em” body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”left” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ _builder_version=”3.0.98″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Show Host” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”25px” header_text_color=”#46db25″][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_team_member name=”Adam M. Ismaeil, aka Iz” position=”Founder of Izsights, Host of High Performance Lab” image_url=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/23130503_1718601138213020_6242800815693629198_n-e1515195961402.jpg” twitter_url=”https://twitter.com/adammismaeil” linkedin_url=”https://www.linkedin.com/in/adamismaeil” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#000000″][/et_pb_team_member][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″ _builder_version=”3.0.98″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Show Guest” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”25px” header_text_color=”#46db25″][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_team_member name=”Sasquatch, aka Big Foot” position=”Lord of The Pacific Northwest” image_url=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/IMG_0488-e1515199173766.jpg” linkedin_url=”https://www.linkedin.com/in/conorbollinger” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#000000″]Follow the homie on the Discovery Channel
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High Performance Lab 001 | Story Behind Podcast + Adam’s Background

[et_pb_section bb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”center” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]

To kick things off, Adam’s good friend Conor Bollinger steps in to host the show and interview adam on his background story and motivation for starting the High Performance Lab. In this conversation Adam brings us up to speed on his background and the evolution of his thought process that led to identifying a massive gap in health & performance knowledge for most people. In the last 15 minutes, enjoy a rapid fire segment with questions ranging from their least favorite subway line to what decade each would have loved to grow up in.

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”center” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]

“I genuinely believe good opportunities come to you, or your own ideas become opportunities, when you’re working your ass off and doing the right things for the right reasons…”

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.98″ text_orientation=”center”]<iframe width=”100%” height=”166″ scrolling=”no” frameborder=”no” allow=”autoplay” src=”https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/356928050&color=%2346db25&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true”></iframe>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb title=”Subscribe On iTunes, Now!” url=”https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/high-performance-lab/id1314774483?mt=2″ image=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/icons8-apple-80.png” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ /][et_pb_blurb content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”center” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px”]

“My goal from the start, somehwat selfishly, was to start building an online presence around somethign I was passioante about..and I’ve recently had my eyes opened to the fact that if you’re not starting something your passionate about online, at least giving it a shot, then your losing ground in an era where the costs to start are virtually zero.”

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_blurb title=”The Beats” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”left” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px” header_line_height=”1.7em”]

Intro/Outro:  Blow Horn Joint Off of DJ Premier’s Beatz That Collected Dust, Volume 1

Segways: Flava in Ya Ear by Craig Mack

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Show Notes” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|||||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Alef||||||||” body_text_align=”left” body_font_size=”18px” body_text_color=”#000000″ body_letter_spacing=”1px” header_line_height=”1.7em”]

  • Upfront Intro to the Podcast [ 0:00:00 to 0:06:26 ]
  • On Air with Conair
  • Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter: @performtrue@highperformancelab
  • Episode Introduction Hosted by Conor [ 0:06:48 to 0:11:54 ]
  • Adam’s Story [ 0:12:15 to 0:33:25 ]
  • What led to starting Perform True [ 0:33:30 to 0:42:23 ]
  • Short term and long term goals of the brand [ 0:42:43 to 0:46:55 ]
  • What differentiates perform true from the other health & performance brands [ 0:47:06 to 0:49:23 ]
  • Adam’s response to “you’re out of your gourd”  [ 0:49:32 to 0:51:46 ]
  • Conor and Adam share what they’re most excited about [ 0:51:54 to 0:53:50 ]
  • Rapid Fire Questions [ 0:54:10 to 1:01:30 ]
  • Closing Thoughts by Adam [ 1:01:47 to 1:05:42]

[/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.98″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”1_2″][et_pb_blurb title=”Show Host” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”25px” header_text_align=”center” header_text_color=”#46db25″ /][et_pb_team_member name=”Conor Bollinger” position=”Amateur Elite Triathlete, Host of OnAir W/Conair” image_url=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Bollinger-2_smaller.jpg” linkedin_url=”https://www.linkedin.com/in/conorbollinger” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#000000″ /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”1_2″][et_pb_blurb title=”Show Guest” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”25px” header_text_align=”center” header_text_color=”#46db25″ /][et_pb_team_member name=”Adam M. Ismaeil, aka Iz” position=”Founder of Izsights, Host of High Performance Lab” image_url=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/23130503_1718601138213020_6242800815693629198_n-e1515195961402.jpg” twitter_url=”https://twitter.com/adammismaeil” linkedin_url=”https://www.linkedin.com/in/adamismaeil” _builder_version=”3.0.98″ header_font=”Cuprum|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#000000″ /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Digestive Enzymes – Often Overlooked And Underappreciated

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ custom_padding=”0px|0px|0px|0px”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” custom_padding=”0|0px|25.2563px|0px”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.92″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Everyone’s Screaming %22Gut Health%22″ content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

Hello everybody, hey, hi, how ya dern? Good I hope. I’m sure many of you have been hearing (loudly) about gut health theses days and why it’s important for proper digestion, absorption of nutrients, cogntitive function and immune support.

I bet you’ve even heard gut health linked to things that seem very far removed from the gut…

Like cognitive development during infancy, how your microbiota can influence onset of obesity, and how the bacteria in your gut can be so revolutionary to your health that people are doing fecal transparents.

Wait, what? Yep – it’s been studied rather extensively. I’m new to this poo-in-a pill concept and first heard Dr. Steven Gundry speak about it on a podcast.

But I’m digressing away from the point of this article, so you can check out this article from Dr. Joseph Mercola: Fecal Transplant.

While the importance of gut health, bacteria and the overall microbiome has become increasingly clear over the last 10 years and I plan to discuss this extensively in the future, what we often overlook are Digestive Enzymes. The little guys responsible for speeding up chemical reactions in our body, especially those required for our digestive processes…

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”The Digestive System” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Overview: Gut Health & Microbiome” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

The digestive system mechanically and chemically breaks down food into smaller components, handles absorption and uptake of nutrients from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract into either the blood or the lymph. All the nutrients found in foods – proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and water – are made ready by the digestive system. And obviously, as we know, what comes in must go out so our digestive system is responsible for the breakdown and excretion of waste on the other end.

Digestion is facilitated primarily by the organs that make up the GI tract – mouth & salivary glands, esophagus, the stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and the rectum – but there are several important accessory organs that help out too. Those are the Pancreas, Liver and Gallbladder.

Yet here is what many of us forget about our digestive system – not only does it carry out the functions of digestion and absorption – but it also plays a huge role in our immune system. Here’s how…

Our nutrition, or the inputs we choose to consume to stay alive, whether it’s food, supplements or any form of sustenance – it’s coming from the external environment. And we’re introducing bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms to our bodies through the inputs we take in from outside. The GI tract plays a crucial role in being a physical barrier to entry for these microorganisms that accompany the food we take in. The GI tract also produces a host of antibodies, lymphocytes and macrophages that are components and first line defense mechanisms of our immune system.

We also have our own gut bacteria, called “resident bacteria” that set up shop in, and call home, our GI tract. Especially in the large intestine, you find what is commonly called Microbiota or Microflora – these microorganisms live in our gut and are part of the body’s overall Microbiome, another buzzword lately. In Lehman’s terms, the Microbiome is the entire system of microorganisms that live throughout the body, not just in the GI tract.

Microbiome is massively important, especially in the gut. The healthy bacteria that live in our intestine (microbiota) help keep pathogenic bacteria under control, they aid in absorption by synthesizing nutrients, vitamins and short-chain fatty acids that produce energy for the cells of our large intestine.

My guess is, you’ve heard all that before with everyone screaming about “gut health” these days. And not to criticize, that’s for sure, as I’ll be writing about Gut Health as well, particularly some interesting findings around the correlation of gut health in infants to cognitive function and development, obesity, overall body type and chronic disease prevention. Exciting stuff. But there is another digestive system component and a few related topics worth considering that I want to cover in this post…

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_image src=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Digestive-System-2.png” align=”center” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ max_width=”60%”][/et_pb_image][et_pb_blurb title=”The Role of Enzymes (Visually)” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_code _builder_version=”3.0.98″ text_orientation=”center”]<iframe src="https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vSHifyCcFcn95HI2rcTeF8K4FFsd-ha34QBoPxmsqk96TMboqQWJqwiHKEB2G1CjFDRgK5BTmNrYB10/embed?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000" frameborder="0" width="1440" height="839" allowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true"></iframe>[/et_pb_code][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”0|0px|0px|0px” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.92″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”The Forgotten Facilitators of Digestion” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”What is a Digestive Enzyme?” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

Digestive Enzymes are compounds that aid in the breakdown of our macronutrient inputs: carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Specifically, these enzymes play a key role in speeding up chemical reactions – a process called catalysis that increases the speed at which a chemical reaction occurs with the help of another substance. Digestive enzymes play the role of the “catalyst” or the additional substance that helps bring together molecules and create more favorable environment for digestion. The chemical reactions that enzymes help out in the digestive process are called hydrolysis reactions, which break down a compound by adding water (H20). So without digestive enzymes, the process would be much slower with water acting alone. In the slide presentation below you can see a visual representation of this processing using the disaccharide (two simple sugars bonded together) called Sucrose which we know as table sugar.

Produced in the salivary glands, stomach, pancreas and small intestine – the bulk of our digestive enzymes are synthesized by the pancreas and small intestine – and it’s important to note that we have specific enzymes for each macronutrient, meaning the enzymes which facilitates (hydrolyzes) the digestion of a sugar like sucrose (the enzyme is sucrase) is useless for digesting lactose (we’d need the enzyme lactase). These enzymes fall into the following buckets, mapping to the macronutrients they’re responsible for hydrolyzing:

  • Amylases catalyze (hydrolyze) Carbohydrates; examples include maltase, lactase, sucrase
  • Lipases catalyze (hydrolyze) Fats; examples include
  • Proteases catalyze (hydrolyze) Proteins; examples include

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”3 Digestive Enzyme Considerations” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

Ok so we’ve refreshed our memory when it comes to the important role digestive enzymes play. Now what? Well, there are a number of key considerations that are often overlooked when it comes to digestive enzymes…

[/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Alef|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_text_align=”left” body_font_size=”16px”][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Food Pairing” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

TBD

    [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”No I’m not Your Mom, But Chew Your Food” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

    I’m someone who constantly has to remind myself (or be reminded) to slow down when I eat. Probably a nervous habit, or just because I was a mad man as a kid. So that was my mother’s job back then, to remind me to slow down. But here’s a little bit of the science behind it…

    Digestion starts in the mouth. Mechanically, we use our jaw and teeth to break down food. But you already know that. Chemically, this actually our first interaction with enzymes. Saliva produced in the mouth consists of a variety of important substances, and introduces us to Lysozymes and Amylases. The former are enzymes designed to kill bacteria and the latter are enzymes which break down starches into simple sugars. Essentially, these enzymes are our first line of digestion defense and kick start the process.

    Reminding you to slow down, chew your food and allow digestion to start might seem small minded. But consider the fact that, unfortunately, food is in our mouth for such a short period of time even when we’re conscious of this, that amylase and lysozomes can only break down or do 5% of their job on average. Give them any less time to work, and you’re definitely adding unwarranted distress to your downstream digestive processes…

      [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Improving Your Digestive Enzymes” content_max_width=”1100px” _builder_version=”3.0.106″ header_font=”Montserrat|700||on|||||” header_text_align=”left” header_font_size=”30px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”2.5em” body_font=”Montserrat||||||||” body_font_size=”22px” body_text_color=”#353740″ body_line_height=”1.8em” saved_tabs=”all”]

      Getting your digestive enzymes is actually debated at length among dietitians and nutritionists. Some argue it’s best to get digestive enzymes from raw fruits and vegetables, while others argue that regardless of the source, our stomach acids will break them down immediately. The bottom line is that aside from supplementing with enzymes, natural foods like sprouted seeds, legumes, pineapple, mango, kiwi, avocado, raw honey, coconut oil and raw dairy products are great sources of digestive enzyme replenishment.

        [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

        The Effective Executive by Peter Drucker

        [et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ custom_padding=”0px|0px|0px|0px”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.97″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.97″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_image src=”https://izsights.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/effective-executive.jpg” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ align=”center” max_width=”36%” module_alignment=”center”][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.0.92″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” module_alignment=”center”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.92″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”%22Brilliant men Are Often Strikingly Ineffectual%22″ content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.92″ header_font=”Permanent Marker|700|||||||” header_text_align=”center” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_line_height=”1.5em” body_font=”Roboto|700|||||||” body_text_align=”center”]– Pg.1, yep numero uno, so remember it.
        [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row custom_padding=”25.5938px|0px|0px|0px” _builder_version=”3.0.47″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.92″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_blurb title=”Overview” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Roboto”]

        Author Peter F. Drucker was a management legend and his writings, based on a 65 year management consulting career, are landmarks of professionals working in just about every sector imagineable: private and government, businesses and non-profits, and in some of the most important industries of the 20th century including automobiles, manufacturing, and even working with high ranking government officals.

        Written in 1967 and updated as recently as 2006 – Drucker speaks extensively about rapid change and innovation in the United State’s increasingly global and service oriented economy – specifically highlighting and honing in on how two key subsets of the economy are impacted: individuals and organizations. The rapid change and innovation, brought on by advancements in science, technology and engineering are not focused on heavily within the scope of the book but are considerd. Specifically, they’re considered as the catalysts or drivers for structural change in our economy back then as well as today.

        Drucker coined the term “knowledge worker” to describe the new type of individual worker our economy’s organizations began to demand as a result of the structural changes and advancements. Essentially, knowledge workers are individuals who gather and leverage information to analyze, communicate and make decisions on behalf of themselves or an organization. Knowledge workers, Drucker argues, were already becoming a majority of the workforce at the time and in the future, everone would be a knowledge worker. The first key narrative, highlighted by the quote above, is that you don’t require brilliance, off the charts intelligence or a slew of innate leadership qualities…

        “Effectiveness can be learned.”

        The second key narrative is that each and every one of us is a knowledge worker – either for ourselves, within an organization, or both – and despite not every one of us having an “executive” title, we all have executive responsibilities. Learning how to be more effective, Drucker argues, is our responsibility as individuals, organizations and society as a whole. Making better decisions, using time more wisely and being more aware of how our habits and tendencies impact others is essential for society, and therefore must be learned…

        “Only Executive Effectiveness can enable this society to harmonize its two needs: the needs of the organization to obtain from the individual the contribution it needs, and the need of the individual to have organization serve as his tool for the accomplishment of his purposes. Effectiveness must be learned.”

        Drucker accurately and wisely had the foresight to predict the importance of the role computers and machines would play in the economy – and that it would be our responsibility to learn how to be effective, in harmony, with these technological advancements.  In addition to these narratives, Drucker offers eight key practices of effective executives and then walks through the “how” to be effective in seven key chapters, both of which I’ll discuss below.

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Why I Started Reading It + What I Hoped To Get Out Of It” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Roboto”]

        Efficiency has always fascinated me. Finding ways to do something better has been a life-long mission. But it isn’t always easy and just because I’m interested doesn’t mean I’m good. I always believe that just like with anything else, there are ebbs and flows in life, where we consistently need to be refreshed and reminded of how we can be more effective.

        One of those refreshers for me ended up being this book. But first, I heard about it from Tim Ferriss (go figure), a few podcasts, read about the deep work of knowlege workers in Deep Work by Cal Newport and heard or saw the knowledge worker concept which Drucker coined referenced extensively. Allegedly, the book was great for “anyone looking to maximize productivity and efficiency” – but I was a bit skeptical, and here’s why…

        First off, I saw when it was published and knew Peter Drucker was old. I assumed this was your typical book on management in the context of corporate organizations. And typical in the sense that it was dry and boring, which many books like this can be. I’ve also been a long time fan of Michael Porter – the legendary Harvard Business School professor, author of Competitive Strategy & Competitive Advantage, and founder of the Institute for Strategy & Competitiveness.

        Being a fan of Porter’s, I have started seeing the work of another wizard from Harvard Professor Clayton Christensen (Author of Innovator’s Dilemma and a few more) – and I have to say that some of their work competes with eachother. And competition, as Porter would agree, is a good and necessary thing. But with all of the rapid innovation and change of today it’s extremely hard to predict which business, entrepreneurship and management concepts are worth a damn today or will hold a candle in tomorrow.

        I did so because within the first few pages you realize that the book is designed for anyone managing and making decisions for themselves or for other people.

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Review + Rating + Who I’d Recommend It To” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Roboto”]

        First of all, this book is one of the best books on management and decision making I’ve encountered. Probably the best. Despite it’s consultant-speak and management terminology that may bore some readers, the good news is, it’s short and concise. Drucker does an awesome job outlining case-based examples that simply make sense in lehman’s terms and to anyone.

        Because the book is highly leverageable – meaning it’s specific, prescriptive and actionable (and I’d expect nothing less from a consultant of 65 years) – I’d recommend this book to absolutely anyone who wants to manage themselves and/or others more effectively especially when it comes to time management and decision making processes.

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”Key Lessons & Takeaways” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700||on|||||” header_font_size=”20px” header_text_color=”#46db25″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        Sure, this is a phenomenal read for executives, business professionals, managers and of course entrepreneurs. But some of the lessons are shockingly applicable to all of us when it comes to productivity, time management and decision making. I’m going to focus this section there, and the next section will have a more straight-lined synopsis of the chapters.

         

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”1) Effective vs. Efficient” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker,Roboto”]

        Being truly effective combines both effectiveness and efficiency. This pursuit is challenging whether you’re truly a big wig executive, an entrepreneur, young professional, college student or work-from-home mom. Getting the expected results of your own efforts and/or the efforts of your organization is the end game, and yet it can only be done effectively by combining both.

        Effectiveness is doing the right things.

        Efficiency is doing things the right way.

        Being Truly Effective Is Doing The Right Things, The Right Way.

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”2) Stop Multi-Tasking, Start Delegating” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        This is a huge problem today. We’re surrounded by an overload of stimulus from information that’s more readily available and increasingly distracting. Even within a workplace or organization, we’re constantly distracted by completing deliverables and actually executing on tasks, versus sitting in meetings, joining conference calls, each with competing priorities and levels of importance. So how the hell do we stop multi-tasking? Well, we’ll get to that in a bit.

        “I have never encountered an executive who remains effective while tackling more than two tasks at a time.”

        Knowing what has to be done is not enough. You have to be able to prioritize it to be effective. Asking yourself “What must be done now?” or “What is massively urgent right here and now?”, and then focusing on that answer only.

        The other key here is delegating. Asking yourself, of the top priorities on your agenda or to-do-list, are there any that are best suited to be delegated to someone else.

        “…he (Jack Welch) asked himself which of the two or three tasks at the top of the list he himself was best suited to undertake. Then he concentrated on that task and the others he delegated.”

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”3) Effectiveness Is Learned – Follow these 5 Essential Habits” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        Alluded to earlier, there is no strong positive correlation between brilliance or intelligence and effectiveness. It is a discipline that can be learned and must be learned.

        “Brilliant men are often strikingly ineffectual.”

        Intelligence, creativity, imagination and the valued resource of knowledge are all well and good. But they are nothing without effectiveness, which converts them into results.

        At the time of writing, today and into perpetuity the value of knowledge…more specifically the authority of knowledge…will always be demanded, and will always take precedence of the authority of position or leadership.

        “…The experience of the human race indicates strongly that the only person in abundant supply is the universal incompetent. We will therefore have to staff our organizations with people who at best excel in one of these abilities.”

        In order to build and hone effectiveness, Drucker outlines five essential habits:

        1. Manage Your Time: Effective executives know where there time goes
        2. Focus on Results Outside of The Organizaton: Effective executives focus on outward contributions
        3. Focus on Opportunities, Not Problems: Effective executives build on strengths
        4. Effective executives focus on the few major areas where superior performance wil produce outstanding results.
        5. Effective executives make effective decisions.

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”4) %22Know Thy Time%22 – Seriously, Analyze Your Time by Making a Log” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        In college and in looking for your first job you constantly hear about time management. It’s hilarious, because very few of us, even athletes, really had to effectively manage our time relative to real deadlines and commitments the way you do in the working world…and that is true whether your working for yourself, in an organization, or both.

        The mistake most of us make is starting with looking at our work and analyzing what must be done. You know, drawing up a to do list? While that’s well-intentioned, the plans always land on paper (or digitally) and rarely turn into execution.

        “Time is the scarcest resource, and unless it is managed, nothing else can be managed. The analysis of one’s time, moreover, is the one easily accessible and yet systematic way to analyze one’s work and to think through what really matters in it.”

        In order to see results in your life, business, etc. you have to follow a three step process for analyzing your time:

        RECORD YOUR TIME –  before you can manage your time, you actually have to know where it goes. Developing a log and closely tracking how every minute of the day is spent provides valuable information to be more productive in the future when managing time (step #2) and looking for opportunities to consolidate chunks of time together where real work can be done. How you record your time isn’t important. Just remember, the more granular level of tracking you can perform, the better you can systematically manage time, which is the next step…

        “To be effective, every knowledge worker, and especially every executive, therefore needs to be able to dispose of time in fairly large chunks.”

        MANAGE YOUR TIME –  this is effectively, analyzing your log of how you spent (spend) your time, and looking for non-productive and time wasting activities. One of the biggest goals, alluded to in the quote above, is to block out large chunks of time. Learning, growing, making big decisions and doing anything that is really worth doing requires large blocks of time. How do you do this? Via a number of key questions…

        • Identify time-wasters by asking “What would happen if this were not done at all? and when the answer is nothing at all, bingo, you can get rid of those tasks, activities, meetings, etc.

        Remember folks, busy is an option. Learning how to say that little two letter word is crucial…

        “It’s amazing how many things busy people are doing that never will be missed…actually, all one has to do is learn to say ‘no’ if an activity contributes nothing to one’s own organization, to oneself, or the organization to which it is to be performed…”

        • Intelligently delegate by asking “Which of the activities on my time log could be done by somebody else just as well, if not better?”; this is especially true if and when you’re running a business or managing the execution of other people. If you’re the brains behind the operation or the one in charge, delegation is actually a misleading term. When you’re in a meeting, your not getting work done. Work and meetings cannot happen simultaneously. If you can send a junior member of the team to attend the meeting on your behalf, or teach them how to build reporting tools, then your not asking them to do your work…you’re having them take care of the work of the team so that you can focus on your own deeper work.

        “Meetings are by definition a concession to deficient organization. For one either meets or one works. One cannot do both at the same time.”

        • Free up those around you and help make them more effective by asking, without being afraid of the truth, “What do I do that wasters others time without contributing to their effectiveness?”

        CONSOLIDATE YOUR TIME – here is where the rewards pay off for anyone looking to find more time to focus on the people, projects and tasks that matter. Once you’ve recorded, analyzed and managed your time you need to look for what’s left over. How much “discretionary” time is available for the big tasks that will really make a difference if completed?

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”5) Focus On Contributions – To Your Self And Others” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        Drucker emphasizes “looking upwards from your own work and outwards towards your goals”. Occupy your thoughts with results intead of efforts. Focus on on asking “What can I contribute that will significantly improve my own results & performance or the performance of those I serve?

        “The focus on contribution is the key to effectiveness: in a man’s own work – its content, its level, its standards, and its impacts; and in his relations with others – his superiors, his associates, subordinates…”

        What I take away from this, most certainly, is to focus on a duty to your own results and the results of the people you serve. Taking pride in what you do for yourself and for others drives you to focus outwardly on how your contributions can transfer into results.

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”6) Making Strenghts Productive Through Optimism” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        Part of the outward responsibility an executive or knowledge worker has with respect to contribution, is to look for opportunities. Drucker emphasizes remaining optimisitc and not wasting time focusing on problems. Your strenghts, current and future, are your opportunities. Spend time focusing on making strenghts productive because strenghts are your opportunities and they are your results.

        “In every area of effectiveness within an organization, one feeds the opportunities and starves the problems.”

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”7) First Things First – Focus + Concentration” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

         “There are always more important contributions to be made than there is time available to make them.”

        That being said, the ability to focus – i.e. concentration – is your secret weapon. You need to be able to hone in and identify “what” the first thing is, and focus solely on that. Don’t be afraid to let go of old tasks that may have once been a priority and are no longer truly adding value, or anticipated to provide results.

         “In order manage many things successfully, you have to focus intensely on one thing at a time.”

        So how do you analyze and determine, from a list of seemingly mission critical to-do’s, which is the “first thing”? Drucker outlines a few key rules for prioritization:

        • Pick the future over the past;
        • Focus on opportunities rather than on problems;
        • Choose your own direction – rather than follow the lead or jump on what everyone else is doing;
        • Aim high – for something that will make a difference if it’s achieved rather than something “safe” and easy to do.

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”8) Making Strenghts Productive Through Optimism” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        Part of the outward responsibility an executive or knowledge worker has with respect to contribution, is to look for opportunities. Drucker emphasizes remaining optimisitc and not wasting time focusing on problems. Your strenghts, current and future, are your opportunities. Spend time focusing on making strenghts productive because strenghts are your opportunities and they are your results.

        “In every area of effectiveness within an organization, one feeds the opportunities and starves the problems.”

        [/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_blurb title=”9) The Elements of Effective Decision Making” content_max_width=”900px” _builder_version=”3.0.97″ header_font=”Roboto Slab|700|on|||on|||” header_font_size=”18px” header_text_color=”#000000″ body_font=”Roboto||||||||” body_font_size=”16px” inline_fonts=”Permanent Marker”]

        As knowledge workers, whether you’re an intern, young professional, seasoned executive, entrepreneur, college student or anyone making decisions – you know that decision making actually comprises the smallest percentage of your time. Most of the other tasks – gathering information, data interpretation, analysis, communication with clients, vendors or colleagues, etc. – are the majority of the tasks of a knowledge worker executes in order to support the most executive task of them all: making the actual decision. So what do you need to know about the elements of the decision process and effective decision making?

        “In every area of effectiveness within an organization, one feeds the opportunities and starves the problems.”

        FEATURES OF THE DECISION PROCESS

        1. The clear realization that the problem was generic and could only be solved through a decision based on a rule/principle;
        2. Establishing Boundary Conditions i.e. defining the specifications which the answer to the problem had to satisfy;
        3. Fully thinking through what is “right” before entertaining compromises and adaptations needed to make the decision acceptable. In other words, identifying what is absolutely the right decision that is best for you or the organization considering no other dependencies, risks, etc.
        4. Building the necessary action items and plan into the decision itself, so that it can be carried out;
        5. The “feedback” which tests the validity and effectiveness of the decision against what actually takes place.

        ELEMENTS OF THE EFFECTIVE DECISION PROCESS

        The following series of questions are the most important elements of making effective decisions:

        1. Understanding whether the situation or problem being analyzed is truly unique or somethign occurs regularly. “Is this a generic situation or an exception?”
        2.  Making clear specifications as to what the decision has to accomplish. Understanding the objectives the decision has to account for and the minimum goals it has to attain. “What are the conditions (“boundary conditions”) the decision has to satisfy?”
        3. Start with what is right, rather than what can be tolerated or acceptable, or even who is right if your in an organizational setting. This is because decisions usually have inevitable compromises after identifying what is right. “For there are two different kinds of compromise. One kind is expressed in the old proverb: ‘Half a loaf is better than no bread.’ The other kind is expressed in the story of the Judgment of Solomon, which was clearly based on the realization that ‘half a baby is worse than no baby at all.”
        4. Converting the decision into action is the fourth major element in the decision-process. In fact, no decision has been made unless carrying it out in specific steps has become someone’s work assignment and responsibility. Until then, there are only good intentions
        5. Feedback has to be built into the decision to provide a continuous testing, against actual events, of the expectations that underlie the decisions.

        [/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]